Archive for March, 2011

BDD BEHAVIOURS – SKIN PICKING

Friday, March 25th, 2011
More than one third of people with BDD pick their skin. This relatively high frequency isn’t surprising, given that skin concerns are so common in BDD. People with BDD who pick are usually concerned about minimal acne, scars, or scabs, or such things as “large” pores, “bumps,” “small black dots,” “white spots,” “ugly things,” or other supposed imperfections. They pick to make their skin look better—to make it smoother, clearer, more attractive. They pop pimples, dig at white heads or blackheads, or smooth bumps. Some try to remove dirt, pus, or “impurities” from under the skin. While many use their hands to pick, pinch, or squeeze, others use tweezers, needles, pins, razor blades, staple removers, or knives.
Picking with implements like these for hours a day can cause major skin damage. One woman picked an actual hole through her nose. Some people have go to the emergency room, because they pick through their facial skin into major blood vessels and need stitches. A colleague told me about a patient who picked so deeply at a pimple on her neck with tweezers that she ruptured her carotid artery, the major blood vessel to the head. She required immediate emergency surgery; the surgeon said that the picking nearly killed her.
Even though skin picking can cause extensive skin damage, it’s important to realize that people with BDD don’t intend to mutilate themselves. Rather, they’re trying to improve how their skin looks. The problem is that the behavior is so compulsive that they can’t stop, which is what causes the damage.
For some people, picking is a relatively inconsequential aspect of their BDD. But for most, the picking is in and of itself a serious problem; some consider it their major problem. One woman attributed her suicide attempt and psychiatric hospitalization to her belief that she had “ruined (her) face because of picking.” Two woman I know of needed psychiatric hospitalization largely because of their picking and eventually committed suicide.
*98\204\8*

BDD BEHAVIOURS – SKIN PICKING More than one third of people with BDD pick their skin. This relatively high frequency isn’t surprising, given that skin concerns are so common in BDD. People with BDD who pick are usually concerned about minimal acne, scars, or scabs, or such things as “large” pores, “bumps,” “small black dots,” “white spots,” “ugly things,” or other supposed imperfections. They pick to make their skin look better—to make it smoother, clearer, more attractive. They pop pimples, dig at white heads or blackheads, or smooth bumps. Some try to remove dirt, pus, or “impurities” from under the skin. While many use their hands to pick, pinch, or squeeze, others use tweezers, needles, pins, razor blades, staple removers, or knives.Picking with implements like these for hours a day can cause major skin damage. One woman picked an actual hole through her nose. Some people have go to the emergency room, because they pick through their facial skin into major blood vessels and need stitches. A colleague told me about a patient who picked so deeply at a pimple on her neck with tweezers that she ruptured her carotid artery, the major blood vessel to the head. She required immediate emergency surgery; the surgeon said that the picking nearly killed her.Even though skin picking can cause extensive skin damage, it’s important to realize that people with BDD don’t intend to mutilate themselves. Rather, they’re trying to improve how their skin looks. The problem is that the behavior is so compulsive that they can’t stop, which is what causes the damage.For some people, picking is a relatively inconsequential aspect of their BDD. But for most, the picking is in and of itself a serious problem; some consider it their major problem. One woman attributed her suicide attempt and psychiatric hospitalization to her belief that she had “ruined (her) face because of picking.” Two woman I know of needed psychiatric hospitalization largely because of their picking and eventually committed suicide.*98\204\8*

ASTHMA AND PREGNANCY

Friday, March 18th, 2011
Pregnant asthmatics are often worried about the effects of their asthma and asthma medications on the unborn child. The ideal would be to have a drug-free pregnancy, but the reality is that most pregnant women with a chronic or persistent illness need to continue with their medication. There are some drugs, including anti-asthma drugs, that should be avoided during pregnancy and preferably no new drugs should be introduced during pregnancy. Fortunately the most commonly prescribed and effective anti-asthma drugs are known to be safe throughout pregnancy — theophylline drugs, Becotide, Pulmicort, Aldecin, Becloforte, Ventolin, Respolin, Atrovent and Bricanyl.
IT IS IMPORTANT TO REALIZE THAT LACK OF OXYGEN DURING AN ACUTE ATTACK CAN BE MORE DAMAGING TO THE UNBORN CHILD THAN MEDICATION. UNCONTROLLED ASTHMA IS A MAJOR RISK FACTOR FOR BOTH THE MOTHER AND CHILD. GOOD CONTROL OF ASTHMA DURING PREGNANCY IS VITAL.
About one percent of pregnant women are asthmatic. Some pregnant asthmatics report an improvement in their health during pregnancy and are able to reduce their medication. (Reducing your medication should not be done without consultation with your doctor.) Statistics show that, in general, one-third of asthmatic women improve during pregnancy, one-third remain unchanged and another third experience worsening symptoms.
It is of the utmost importance that asthma is well-controlled during pregnancy. When an asthmatic woman becomes pregnant, she should consult her doctor immediately and discuss such important issues as medication, general lifestyle and diet, as well as the possible revision of her asthma management plan.
Pregnancy, for many women, is a time when they are particularly vulnerable to emotional upheavals and mood swings. The accompanying psychological stresses can exacerbate their asthma, thus causing a need for extra medication. Many doctors advise their patients to practise relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, meditation and suitable yoga exercises. Such techniques can have an overall beneficial effect on the physical and emotional well-being of a pregnant women.
During the first three months of pregnancy, the fetus is particularly vulnerable to a number of external influences, including exposure to chemical fumes and cigarette smoke, alcohol, lack of nutrients and X-rays. Care should be taken to avoid these dangers. Women should not smoke at any time during their pregnancy and alcohol should be consumed in moderation, if at all.
If pregnant asthmatics adhere to a sensible health regime during their pregnancy, follow their doctors’ advice on necessary medication and avoid the obvious hazards, there is no reason why they cannot expect to have a normal and uncomplicated pregnancy and delivery.
*41\148\2*

ASTHMA AND PREGNANCYPregnant asthmatics are often worried about the effects of their asthma and asthma medications on the unborn child. The ideal would be to have a drug-free pregnancy, but the reality is that most pregnant women with a chronic or persistent illness need to continue with their medication. There are some drugs, including anti-asthma drugs, that should be avoided during pregnancy and preferably no new drugs should be introduced during pregnancy. Fortunately the most commonly prescribed and effective anti-asthma drugs are known to be safe throughout pregnancy — theophylline drugs, Becotide, Pulmicort, Aldecin, Becloforte, Ventolin, Respolin, Atrovent and Bricanyl.IT IS IMPORTANT TO REALIZE THAT LACK OF OXYGEN DURING AN ACUTE ATTACK CAN BE MORE DAMAGING TO THE UNBORN CHILD THAN MEDICATION. UNCONTROLLED ASTHMA IS A MAJOR RISK FACTOR FOR BOTH THE MOTHER AND CHILD. GOOD CONTROL OF ASTHMA DURING PREGNANCY IS VITAL.About one percent of pregnant women are asthmatic. Some pregnant asthmatics report an improvement in their health during pregnancy and are able to reduce their medication. (Reducing your medication should not be done without consultation with your doctor.) Statistics show that, in general, one-third of asthmatic women improve during pregnancy, one-third remain unchanged and another third experience worsening symptoms.It is of the utmost importance that asthma is well-controlled during pregnancy. When an asthmatic woman becomes pregnant, she should consult her doctor immediately and discuss such important issues as medication, general lifestyle and diet, as well as the possible revision of her asthma management plan.Pregnancy, for many women, is a time when they are particularly vulnerable to emotional upheavals and mood swings. The accompanying psychological stresses can exacerbate their asthma, thus causing a need for extra medication. Many doctors advise their patients to practise relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, meditation and suitable yoga exercises. Such techniques can have an overall beneficial effect on the physical and emotional well-being of a pregnant women.During the first three months of pregnancy, the fetus is particularly vulnerable to a number of external influences, including exposure to chemical fumes and cigarette smoke, alcohol, lack of nutrients and X-rays. Care should be taken to avoid these dangers. Women should not smoke at any time during their pregnancy and alcohol should be consumed in moderation, if at all.If pregnant asthmatics adhere to a sensible health regime during their pregnancy, follow their doctors’ advice on necessary medication and avoid the obvious hazards, there is no reason why they cannot expect to have a normal and uncomplicated pregnancy and delivery.*41\148\2*

RISKS OF TYPE 2 DIABETES

Sunday, March 6th, 2011
The risks of type 2 diabetes are well documented; coronary heart disease, dyslipidaemia, blindness, renal failure, amputation and so on. Failing to diagnose the condition, and thus missing the opportunity to prevent the sequelae, is a costly error and an illustration that obesity must not be ignored; 10% of NHS resources are spent on diabetes and its complications, on behalf of only 3% of the population. WHO fact sheet 138 describes diabetes as the most important consequence of obesity. There are currently estimated to be over 150 million cases worldwide, a number that is likely to double by 2025.
One of the most disturbing aspects of the increasing numbers of people with type 2 diabetes is the fact that adult-onset diabetes is now being seen in children as young as 10. Until recently, type 2 diabetes was unknown in children – it was usually restricted to adults over the age of 40. However, because of the increasing levels of childhood obesity it is now being seen in grossly obese children (weighing 20 stone or more). Although the phenomenon was initially reported in the US, the first cases of childhood-onset type 2 diabetes are being seen in the UK. Children such as these have a whole lifetime in which to develop the complications of diabetes, not to mention the comorbidities of obesity itself. Their shortened life expectancy has made some commentators believe that the current generation will be the first in which parents consistently outlive their children.
*2/312/5*

RISKS OF TYPE 2 DIABETESThe risks of type 2 diabetes are well documented; coronary heart disease, dyslipidaemia, blindness, renal failure, amputation and so on. Failing to diagnose the condition, and thus missing the opportunity to prevent the sequelae, is a costly error and an illustration that obesity must not be ignored; 10% of NHS resources are spent on diabetes and its complications, on behalf of only 3% of the population. WHO fact sheet 138 describes diabetes as the most important consequence of obesity. There are currently estimated to be over 150 million cases worldwide, a number that is likely to double by 2025.One of the most disturbing aspects of the increasing numbers of people with type 2 diabetes is the fact that adult-onset diabetes is now being seen in children as young as 10. Until recently, type 2 diabetes was unknown in children – it was usually restricted to adults over the age of 40. However, because of the increasing levels of childhood obesity it is now being seen in grossly obese children (weighing 20 stone or more). Although the phenomenon was initially reported in the US, the first cases of childhood-onset type 2 diabetes are being seen in the UK. Children such as these have a whole lifetime in which to develop the complications of diabetes, not to mention the comorbidities of obesity itself. Their shortened life expectancy has made some commentators believe that the current generation will be the first in which parents consistently outlive their children.*2/312/5*