RELAXATION TECHNIQUES, BIOFEEDBACK FOR STRESS BREAKDOWN TREATMENT: POSSIBILITY TO FURTHER STRESS BREAKDOWN

Some of the relaxation exercise and biofeedback methods have as an underlying theory that feelings of tension under stress are a sign that the sufferer is physically unfit. The inference is that stress should not cause anxiety symptoms in a person whose body is physically fit from regular exercise, and who has his feelings under control.
I reject this concept. It must always be remembered that anxiety response to stress is a normal alarm mechanism. Abnormal physiological states can lead to anxiety symptoms when the person is trying to deal with what might be otherwise a normal stress load. I fear that some people giving advice about stress management seem to believe that anxiety under excess stress can be reduced by their methods.
The promise of some relaxation techniques and biofeedback methods, that they can dismantle the alarm reaction which warns us when we begin to overload the nervous system, seems at best ineffective, and at the worst, possibly harmful.
I believe that abuse and disrespect for ourselves is part of the human condition, and I tend to view the proposed use of techniques which would free us from the penalty of overloading our nervous systems, as just another example of the human behaviour which tends to make us vulnerable to stress breakdown in the first place. The promise that modern biofeedback methods are able to combat stress, in my view, just leads people to think they can cheat the system, and get more and more work out of their over-stressed nervous systems without paying any price. In fact, attitudes such as these are the classical preconditions for progressing from stage one stress breakdown to stage two and stage three. I tend to see therefore, some of these stress management programmes as potentially capable of producing serious stress breakdown, if they are used in ignorance of the real function of the anxiety response as a warning signal of overload.
*46/129/5*

RELAXATION TECHNIQUES, BIOFEEDBACK FOR STRESS BREAKDOWN TREATMENT: POSSIBILITY TO FURTHER STRESS BREAKDOWN

Some of the relaxation exercise and biofeedback methods have as an underlying theory that feelings of tension under stress are a sign that the sufferer is physically unfit. The inference is that stress should not cause anxiety symptoms in a person whose body is physically fit from regular exercise, and who has his feelings under control.I reject this concept. It must always be remembered that anxiety response to stress is a normal alarm mechanism. Abnormal physiological states can lead to anxiety symptoms when the person is trying to deal with what might be otherwise a normal stress load. I fear that some people giving advice about stress management seem to believe that anxiety under excess stress can be reduced by their methods.The promise of some relaxation techniques and biofeedback methods, that they can dismantle the alarm reaction which warns us when we begin to overload the nervous system, seems at best ineffective, and at the worst, possibly harmful.I believe that abuse and disrespect for ourselves is part of the human condition, and I tend to view the proposed use of techniques which would free us from the penalty of overloading our nervous systems, as just another example of the human behaviour which tends to make us vulnerable to stress breakdown in the first place. The promise that modern biofeedback methods are able to combat stress, in my view, just leads people to think they can cheat the system, and get more and more work out of their over-stressed nervous systems without paying any price. In fact, attitudes such as these are the classical preconditions for progressing from stage one stress breakdown to stage two and stage three. I tend to see therefore, some of these stress management programmes as potentially capable of producing serious stress breakdown, if they are used in ignorance of the real function of the anxiety response as a warning signal of overload.
*46/129/5*

Share and Enjoy:
  • Digg
  • Sphinn
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Twitter
  • Yahoo! Bookmarks

Random Posts

Comments are closed.